SCAS – Southern Colorado Skies – 9/21 to 9/27/2015

Consider a planetarium program to help you plan your observations. There are many commercial products available, and a very good program (Cartes du Ciel) is available free at http://www.ap-i.net/skychart/en/start.

September’s full moon on Sunday, September 27th, will include a total lunar eclipse. PLEASE join SCAS at the Nature Center for this event and our annual party – this eclipse occurs in the early evening! More details AT http://scaspueblo.com/september2015calendar.html

df_eclipsek_4-14-2014ECLIPSE TIMING FOR PUEBLO,COLORADO:

partial eclipse begins: 6:11 p.m.

(sunset at 6:53 p.m.)

full eclipse begins: 8:11 p.m.

MAXIMUM ECLIPSE: 8:47 p.m.

full eclipse ends: 9:23 p.m.

partial eclipse ends: 10:27 p.m.

penumbral eclipse ends: 11:22 p.m.

Monday (September 21):

First-quarter Moon at 2:59 a.m. MDT. Look for the Moon just above Sagittarius in the south just after dusk

Wednesday (September 23):

The autumnal equinox occurs at 2:21 a.m.

Thursday (September 24):

Look for Mars less than 1 degree to the left of Regulus in the predawn sky to the east. Bring binoculars or a small telescope for the best chance of spotting it! Look about 11 degrees to the lower left of very bright Venus. The look about the same distance to the lower left of Mars to spot Jupiter.

Sunday, (September 27):

LUNAR ECLIPSE! (See information, above.)

Planets:

Mercury (in Virgo):

Invisible in the Sun’s glare.

Venus (in Cancer):

Magnitude -4.8 rises in the eastern dawn sky about 3:30 a.m. A thickening crescent through a telescope or binoculars, but shrinking later in the week.

Mars (in Leo):

About 11 degrees to lower left of Venus before dawn.

Jupiter (in Leo):

Even lower than Mars in the predawn sky – good luck! About 9 degrees to the lower left of Regulus.

Saturn (in Libra/Scorpius):

In the southwest as darkness falls. About 11 degrees to the right of Antares in Scorpius.

Uranus (in Pisces):

Well up in the eastern sky by 11 p.m.

Neptune (in Aquarius):

Well up in the southeastern sky by about 10 p.m..

Iridium Flares and International Space Station (ISS):

Sorry – these are too numerous to list here! If you’re serious, load the ISS DETECTOR app on your smart phone or tablet. Alternatively, refer to SCAS member Chuck Percival’s column in the Sunday Pueblo Chieftain.

Have fun!

Dave Furry, President SCAS

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