Southern Colorado Astronomical Society
September 2018
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wenesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
            1
2
3
4
5
6
SCAS Board Meeting At
Village Inn, See below for
Details
7
Star gaze at
NWDC, 7:00 to
9:00pm
8
National
Sand Dune
Star Gaze
9
10
11
12
13
Astrophotography SIG
meeting.  7pm
Pueblo South Side Village
Inn
.
14
Stargaze at the
Lake
7pm to 9pm
15
16
17
18
19
20
SCAS Monthly Meeting
Dr. Fred Sarazin
The Era of
Multi-Messenger
Astronomy and
Astrophysics has Begun
21
22
23/30
24
25
26
27
28
29
SCAS
Annual
Picnic at the
La Veta
Astro Park
September 2018
CURRENT MOON
Stargaze at the Lake, Friday Sept.
14th beginning at 7pm.  Lake
Pueblo Visitors Center

Is that a star or a planet?  What constellation is that?  How close is the nearest
star to Earth?  So many questions when we gaze into the night sky and yet we
so enjoy looking up.  For thousands of years our ancestors gazed towards the
heavens; understanding the passing of the seasons, when to plant the seed
and when to harvest the crop, when the longest night was nigh and when the
longest day called for celebration.  Our ancestors had a little astronomer as
part of who they were.  Now we look up and feel lost.  Let’s together Discover
Your Inner Astronomer.

The Southern Colorado Astronomical Society holds its popular and successful
summer series Stargaze at the Lake Friday Sept. 14th.  Now in its 7th
consecutive season SCAS has educated hundreds of guests at this weekend
escape location.  Join us in the auditorium to start the night as we teach
observing techniques then cover what’s in the sky that evening.  Once we have
finished the power point presentation it’s time to move outside to the highly
anticipated star gaze.  Look through society members telescopes as we tour the
jewels found near and far and learn about those very same treasures.  Trace
out constellations, find the north star, learn that the star you see is actually a
planet.  This is free to attend and everyone of all ages is welcome.   At the end
of the night your inner astronomer will thank you.
As CSU-Pueblo continues a process of repair on the observatory
the Southern Colorado Astronomical Society continues the
tradition of hosting a Public Night at the facility.  While we cannot
offer the view from a 20-inch telescope, we can offer a view that
nearly rivals that of the large telescope; a view that will help you
Discover Your Inner Astronomer.

Our summer series of Public Night under the Observatory
concludes Friday September 7th from 7pm until 9pm and
everyone is invited.  Join us at the base of Observatory Hill as
members of the Southern Colorado Astronomical Society set up
state of the art high power telescopes.  Witness breath taking
views of distant stellar nurseries where stars are being created.  
See the most ancient citizens of our Milky Way Galaxy and
Universe, Globular Clusters, as they gleam from the halo of our
galaxy.  Visit the planets of our solar system where robotic
ambassadors from Earth now conduct research. And if you are
lucky watch a shooting star burn across the sky or see a satellite
catch light from our local star and reflect it to our eyes.  Help us
keep a Pueblo tradition alive and well while the observatory
undergoes repair.  Trust us, Your Inner Astronomer will thank you.
Friday September 7th, 7pm to 9pm
Saturday September 8th SCAS along with other
astronomical organizations from Colorado will hold a
star gaze at the National Sand Dunes.  For additional
information follow the link below and scroll down to
September 8th.
https://www.nps.gov/grsa/planyourvisit/calendar.htm
Since their discovery in 2015, gravitational waves have joined
photons, neutrinos and cosmic-rays as astronomical
messengers of our Universe. On August 17, 2017 a neutron star
merger was observed for the first time by the LIGO and VIRGO
gravitational wave detectors. But that's not all! About 2 seconds
after the merger, a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) event was
observed by detectors on board of satellites and the location of
the merger could be pinpointed with high accuracy. Those initial
observations were followed in the hours, days and weeks that
followed by additional detection of electromagnetic radiation at
different wavelengths by other telescopes on the ground and in
space. Hence, for the very first time, a cosmic event was
witnessed and measured using more than one cosmic
messenger. Earlier this year, a high-energy neutrino was
detected by the Ice Cube experiment in Antarctica in
coincidence with gamma-rays during a violent cosmic event.
This marks the discovery of yet another type of multi-messenger
events. The consequences for astronomy and astrophysics are
far reaching and will be discussed throughout this presentation.

CSU-P, The Life Sciences Building, Room 105 (the auditorium)
7pm Sept. 20th.  Free of Charge Open to the Public
Dr. Fred Sarazin is a Professor of Physics at the Colorado School of Mines.  He got his PhD in France late in the last millennium.  After two
postdoctoral fellowships in the UK and Canada, he joined the Mines physics faculty in 2003.  His areas of expertise are in experimental low-energy
nuclear physics and cosmic-ray physics.  When not on campus or traveling, Dr. Sarazin enjoys spending time with his family and riding his mountain
bike.  He does not like falling from it.